Sticker Shock About One In Three Who Visit Hospital Hit With Surprise

first_img The Arizona Republic: Survey: Insurance Shortchanging Doctors, Patients NBC News: Hefty Surprise Medical Bills Can Be A Burden For Families According to Consumer Reports, nearly one third of Americans who have visited a hospital in the last year have received a surprise medical bill. In Texas, more than 20 percent of hospitals considered in-network by the top 3 insurers had no in-network emergency room doctors on staff. (Sterns and Capetta, 5/13) Sticker Shock: About One In Three Who Visit Hospital Hit With Surprise Medical Bills As insurers and hospitals point fingers at each other, it’s the patient who ends up paying thousands unexpectedly. In other news, ER doctors weigh in on costs in a survey. center_img This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Four out of five emergency-room doctors who responded to an American College of Emergency Physicians survey believe that privately insured patients have skipped needed medical care because of concerns about out-of-pocket costs. (Alltucker, 5/15) last_img read more

Tesla Model 3 1000Mile Road Trip Total Charging Time And Cost

first_img 3,000 Miles In A Tesla Model 3 Performance: Video An Up Close Look At The Tesla Model 3 Road Trip Experience Source: Electric Vehicle News Tesla Model 3 Mountain Road Trip Experience: 500 Miles Driven Regardless of the above, if your trip is long enough that it requires multiple charging stops, you will have to plan ahead for the extra time. Once you realize how much money you’ll save, among a long list of other perks of EV ownership, you’ll likely realize the extra time is worth it. YouTuber Andy Slye sets out on a 990-mile road trip to share how much time it takes him to charge, as well as the total cost involved. He notes that he charged the Model 3 four times and averaged about 25 minutes per stop. Total charging time was one hour and 38 minutes, and the 990-mile journey cost him less than $13.Video Description via Andy Slye on YouTube:1,000 Mile Trip in a Tesla Model 3: The TRUTH About ChargingTesla Model 3 road trip test: How it handles 1,000 miles! This is a test to see how my RWD Long Range Model 3 does on a long road trip. Turns out it’s an awesome car for traveling!4 total Supercharging stops:Brentwood TN (36 mins) +177 miles for $3.70Athens AL (28 mins) +127 miles for $3.90Athens AL (20 mins) +70 miles for $2.20Bowling Green KY (14 mins) +115 miles for $3.08Total Supercharging Time: 1 hr 38 mins (25 mins average per stop)Total Supercharging Cost for 990 mile trip: $12.88Avg 249 Wh/mileTESLA MODEL 3center_img 32 photos How much time will you spend Supercharging a Tesla Model 3 while road-tripping?When it comes to EVs, many people’s biggest concern is still range and charging time. This is not really much of an issue anymore for many electric vehicles, unless you’re using the car for a long road trip. The Tesla Model 3 offers a longer range than most EVs on the market, in addition to being highly efficient. To top it off, the Tesla Supercharger network makes traveling convenient since charging is quick and stations are plentiful and strategically located.Related Tesla Model 3 Coverage: Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 27, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Fuller Moto Working On ZeroBased Electric Cafe Racer

first_imgThis partly completed bike is reportedly based on a Zero FX platform.There seems to be a flurry of electric cafe racers popping up lately. From this reimagined BMW to the futuristic Rumble, manufacturers and customizers alike can’t seem to resist combining the classic design with a modern electric drivetrain. Although not yet officially revealed, some photos have surfaced of a similar project under construction by Caffeine and Octane‘s Bryan Fuller and his company, Fuller Moto.More E-Bikes Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 28, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Mad Max Motorcycle Road Rage Captured On TeslaCam Source: Electric Vehicle News Although there’s nothing about the project on Fuller Moto’s website, Cafe Racers of Instagram recently posted a picture of a work in progress that it says is called “The Majestic.” It’s reportedly based on Zero FX electric motorcycle, which is interesting because Fuller’s creation looks nothing like the original Zero.center_img These pictures raise more questions than they answer. The bike is little but a sleek, bullet-like body that partially surrounds both wheels. These wheels currently stand alone with no obvious hubs or spokes, aside from the presumably temporary particle board in the back wheel. No handlebars are visible, nor is any way to steer the front wheel. Another steering mystery is exactly how the front wheel is supposed to turn at all with the fender and bodywork wrapped so closely around it.Despite the lack of a formal reveal, the bike has appeared on Fuller Moto Facebook page in a wide shot of the entire shop, which also shows the Ford Maverick project that Fuller is working on. The electric cafe racer definitely exists, but aside from what was revealed on Instagram, we know nothing else about it. To me, it looks a lot like the light cycles from the original Tron. Fuller’s project will likely not enclose the rider, nor shoot solid walls behind it that you can use to crash other riders or that tailgating SUV. We’re still looking forward to seeing the finished product.Sources: EVNerds, Cafe Racers Of Instagram Vigo Electric Motorcycle Promises 400 Miles Of Range Lightning Motorcycles Is Moving To A New Facilitylast_img read more

Bugatti Admits Its Thinking About An Electric Car

first_img Supercars Beware: New Tesla Roadster Compared To Bugatti Chiron In the interview, he states that, after developing a string of increasingly fast cars with exorbitant prices to match, the next project for Bugatti might go 180 degrees in the opposite direction. He’s thinking electrification – and not a performance hybrid system, like many of the other luxury sports car manufacturers were displaying at Geneva.“I would see us doing a battery electric vehicle. There, the balance between performance and comfort is much more important, and it’s about daily usability. This is what I see,” said Winkelmann.This may seem like an odd direction for the company to make, but it makes sense to us. Bugatti’s customer data is very different from what you’d see at Chevrolet or Ford. The average Bugatti owner has 42 cars, two of which are Bugattis. More than half of the Chirons sold were bought sight unseen – an impressive feat for any car, let alone one that cost $3 million.Perhaps Bugatti realizes that most of their customers don’t actually use their cars. After building the fastest and most expensive cars, the next challenge may indeed be to build the best car that can actually be used as one.What that means to us is that Bugatti is intending to build a comfortable, luxurious, top-of-the-line daily driver, allowing its existing hypercar customers to enjoy at least some of what Bugatti has to offer on a daily basis.Source: Automotive News Europe Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 17, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Source: Electric Vehicle News Next-Generation Bugatti Chiron Could Go Electriccenter_img After building the fastest and the most expensive cars, building a practical car might be the ultimate challenge for Bugatti.Hot off the heels of their incredible Geneva release of the La Voiture Noire (“the black car” in French), Bugatti boss Stephan Winkelmann hinted that Bugatti may look to enter a very different market segment. While the one-off, $18.9 million La Voiture Noire – the most expensive new car in history – was still drawing oohs and ahhs from those surrounding its display, Winkelmann was chatting it up with Automotive News Europe. More Bugatti News Bugatti Chiron Successor Likely To Be PHEVlast_img read more

PlugIn Electric Car Sales In Finland Reach 57 Market Share

first_img Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 24, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Plug-in electric car sales in Finland – February 2019Source: EV Sales Blog Tesla Model 3 Registrations In Norway Soar To 800 In February 12% Of New Cars Sold In Sweden In February 2019 Were Plug-Ins Source: Electric Vehicle News Finland follows Sweden and Norway by having one of the highest EV market shares.The general car market in Finland shrunk in February by 13%, but plug-in electric car sales are moving forward. In total, some 488 new registrations translated into growth of 25% year-over-year.With 1,109 new registrations YTD (up 22%), market share stands now at a record 5.7% – not bad at all taking into consideration cold climate and incentives that are not as big as in some other markets.According to EV Sales Blog, PHEVs are responsible for 79% of the plug-in car market, but BEVs improved from 14% in 2018 to 21% now. In the next few months, we could see the switch more towards BEVs as first deliveries of the Tesla Model 3 already started.More sales reports Tesla Model 3 Leads Germany To New Plug-In Electric Car Sales Recordlast_img read more

Gary Cahill and Gareth Barry in England practice match bustup

first_imgEngland @domfifield Thu 4 Jun 2009 19.05 EDT This article is more than 10 years old Share via Email England This article is more than 10 years old Manchester City Dominic Fifield in Almaty Share on WhatsApp Share on Twitter Share via Email Kazakhstan Gary Cahill, the Bolton Wanderers defender, had an altercation with Gareth Barry during an England training session. Photograph: John Walton/Epics Sport Fabio Capello First published on Thu 4 Jun 2009 19.05 EDT Topicscenter_img World Cup 2010 Tensions flared in England’s training session at the Dinamo Stadium yesterday as the squad’s most recent call-up, the uncapped centre-back Gary Cahill, clashed with Gareth Barry, his former team-mate at Aston Villa.Cahill, called up following Rio Ferdinand’s withdrawal with his calf problem, scythed Barry down in the penalty area during a practice game overseen by Fabio Capello, with the Bolton defender – a product of Villa’s youth system who joined the club at 15 before his move to the Reebok last year – then refusing to help his former captain up from the turf.While the 23-year-old defender walked away from the incident, Barry, clearly incensed, eventually returned to his feet and subsequently ignored Cahill, with whom he was at Villa Park for eight years. Manchester City’s new £12m signing was fit enough to continue with Wayne Rooney floating the resultant penalty over Robert Green, who will make his full debut against Kazakhstan on Saturdaytomorrow.Shaun Wright-Phillips filled in at right-back in the practice game as Gary Neville missed the session with a toe injury. The veteran Manchester United defender is expected to play some part today when the team move their preparations to Almaty’s Central Stadium, where the World Cup qualifier is to be staged.Capello is expected to play the 4-2-3-1 formation that has served him so well in recent fixtures, though he may ask Frank Lampard – one of the deeper-lying midfielders, alongside Barry – to push further upfield against opponents ranked 137 in the world. Matthew Upson’s prospects of starting alongside John Terry appear to have been enhanced after he featured in the “first team” at training yesterday.Ferdinand, meanwhile, continues to have treatment back at United’s Carrington training complex on the calf complaint that hampered him in the build-up to the Champions League final and prompted his withdrawal from the squad for the game in Kazakhstan. The vice-captain should return to the squad on Sunday ahead of next Wednesday’s qualifier against Andorra at Wembley. Share on LinkedIn Shares00 Share on Pinterest Bolton Wanderers • Former Aston Villa team-mates at loggerheads• Barry scythed down after big-money move to City Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Gary Cahill and Gareth Barry in England practice match bust-up Share on Facebook news Aston Villa Share on Messenger Reuse this contentlast_img read more

Port Hosts Panel Discussion on Regional ChallengesChelan County Commish Candidates Speak at

first_imgThe Port of Chelan County will host a business panel discussion focusing on the region’s biggest challenges.“We have a strong panel representing the Ag industry, the local power industry plus a key political leader” said Craig Larsen, Port of Chelan County Business Development Director “and we’re looking for their insights and perspectives on what the regions biggest challenges are and hopefully ways to move forward and conquer those challenges and see the economy grow and expand”The panel will feature Stemilt Growers President West Mathison, Chelan PUD General Manager Steve Wright and 12th District State Senator Brad Hawkins.To RSVP for the Partners Breakfast meeting on Thursday, Oct. 11th, contact the Port of Chelan County cami@portofchelancounty.com or call  (509) 663-5159.​last_img read more

What My Aging Has Taught Me

first_imgby, Dr. Bill ThomasTweet30Share75Share19Email124 Shares On location at the Age of Disruption performance at Elim Park in Cheshire, Conn. Sponsored by Alzheimer’s Resource CenterWhen I was young my mind and body burned with an unquenchable ambition. In college I got involved in student politics and would not rest until I was elected president of the student body, which I was. I decided I wanted to go to medical school and would not rest until I was admitted to Harvard Medical School, which I was.In those years I believed that there was a single straight line that connected any two points. Point A: where I was. Point B: where I wanted to be. Young people are generally praised for this sort of ambition; I know I certainly was. This is the American ideal of success. Pick a goal and stay the course, no matter what.As I got older the fire of ambition continued to burn brightly but doubts began to creep into the back of my mind. I knew very well that persistence would always be a part of my character but maybe, just maybe, not every journey was meant to be a straight line. Maybe there could be some curves or even some loop-de-loops. I struggled with this insight and repeatedly fell back on the ferocity that had served me so well in my youth.Now that I am in my mid-50’s I can see much more clearly that the whole journey of my life has been packed with twists and turns. In retrospect, those journeys from A to B were never as straight forward as I had believed them to be. Yes, I know, many of you are slapping your forehead and saying, “You’re just figuring this out?!”Yeah, I am. Better late than never.What I love about this age-inspired insight is that it gives me a vastly greater capacity for valuing relationship over performance and placing people ahead of tasks. The recent loss of our daughter Hannah puts an exclamation point on this for me. Life is short. Far too short. We the living are blessed with a opportunity to follow the crazy twisting and turning pathways of life. If we have even a trace of wisdom in us, we will treasure the people who travel that path at our side. One of the most important things that the elders I have cared for taught me is that I will remember the people in my life long after I have forgotten the numbers that I spend far too much time obsessing about.Has it been a long strange trip? Yes it has. Do I want to continue the journey? I sure do. I expect to continue touring the country, to continue listening and learning. The question is, will you share the journey with me?This is a road we will build together, through ups and downs, twists and turns, and we can not allow momentary discouragements or setbacks to lead us astray. Never has this been so clear as in my national Age of Disruption Tour. Last week we debuted in the Northeast with a zigzag line from Northampton, Mass., to Philadelphia, via Manchester, N.H., Cheshire, Conn. and New York. This week we’re all catching our breath and recouping at home. Next week we hit the Midwest–and I hope to see you there.PS: Bring Your Friends!!!Related PostsMy Own AgingMy primary school and high school teachers might scoff at the idea that I was “driven” when I was young. I was a chronically failing student sand received a “social promotion” out of the sixth grade and into the seventh. In high school, I was both president of the student…New Podcast: ReimaginationWelcome to the only Podcast on the web featuring a physician, Dr. Bill Thomas, and musician, Nate Silas Richardson, who team up for the #AskDrBill Show. Today’s question: What is Life Reimagined?My First TriathlonFor my 70th “birthday present” I asked my wife our daughter if we could do something adventurous together.Tweet30Share75Share19Email124 SharesTags: Age of Disruption DisruptAginglast_img read more

The Fountain of Usefulness

first_imgby, Christina Pierpaoli, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShareShareEmail0 Shares Christina PierpaoliAs a psychology Ph.D. student, most of my time is spent tucked away in a lab doing research. The lab is a curious place: at once beguiling, like a Siren, the complexities of the natural world while also keeping them cautiously at bay—controlled, compartmentalized.But it is life’s laboratory that nourishes the stuff of the books and nooks and notes that live in our labs. The most interesting psychological questions are not those that we cautiously contrive, but those with which the natural world indiscriminately confronts us.I did not always know or trust this.Around the same time I’d submitted my first manuscript for publication, my sixty-something father had undergone rotator cuff surgery. Two things preoccupied me: (1) what question(s) would my next publication address, and (2) would my father be okay?In the days following his surgery—between hours of frenetic note taking and reading—I’d call to check in with him. Our conversations usually went like this:Me: “How ya doing, Dad? How are you feeling today?”Dad (in full Brooklynese): “Ay, sweetie! I’m feeling great. In pain, but doing some exercises to feel better.”Me (incredulously): “Exercises? Already? You weren’t even operated on 48 hours ago.”Dad (jokingly): “I’m an important guy—people need me! Like your crazy motha (pronounced: muh-tha)! Gotta make myself useful around here.”And suddenly, I found myself plopped unapologetically in the middle of life’s laboratory. I repeated his words to myself: people need me. People need me. I wondered: was my father’s perceived responsibility his proximal social world—my mother, me, his friends—in some way, influencing how he coped with his pain? Was he feeling needed by and useful to his friends and family, in part, motivating an exercise regime that Jane Fonda herself would envy?My research interests—united in their attempts to understand associations of chronic illness (e.g. osteoarthritis, HIV/AIDS, obesity) with psychological health in older adults—emerge from this question. More specifically, it asks: “How do feelings of usefulness to others in later life influence the selection and application of adaptive health behaviors?”And why am I asking it? Because, all too often in this culture of ours, if you’re old, you’re simply not useful anymore. And really, what’s the use of a culture like that?I’ve begun — under the mentorship and support of Dr. Patricia A. Parmelee— slowly but surely, to answer this question using her samples of older adults with knee osteoarthritis (KOA)—an incurable, chronically painful joint disorder.In the United States, osteoarthritis ranks among the top three health conditions causing disability and is estimated to affect 26.9 million adults. It also represents the most common source of chronic pain in older adults—with more than half over the age of 65 reporting KOA-related pain and about 80 percent reporting some degree of disability or movement limitation. And because KOA cannot be cured, adults learn to cope with the pain either actively—by attempting more or less directly to control it—or passively, through relinquishing control of it. Research across rheumatic diseases (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis) has linked active coping strategies— like direct problem solving— with less pain, functional disability, depression, and greater quality of life than passive approaches.So, what exactly determines how we cope?Deciding to cope actively or passively with knee pain—and pain in general—illustrates a psychologically interesting and complex question because beliefs, values, and goals are heavily involved in that decision. For example, if you believe you meaningfully contribute to, and are needed by a community, might you be motivated to be more active in your approach to coping with pain?Gerontological theories of activity and continuity hold that, to age successfully, older adults aim to maintain the activities and relationships of their earlier years of life. Accordingly, decrements in social and economic participation notwithstanding, older adults desire to remain active, useful, and generative. It stands to reason that feeling useful to others in later life may, in part, motivate the selection of pain management strategies that reinforce and maintain feelings of usefulness, particularly with disabilities like KOA.Indeed, using a sample of 199 persons with physician-confirmed knee osteoarthritis, preliminary results from our ongoing research suggest older adults who endorse feeling more useful— that is—who have relationships that offer opportunities for helping others and who feel validated for their interpersonal worth—are more likely to use active coping strategies to manage their knee pain than those who feel less useful. While further research is needed, our results provide preliminary support for the possibility that feelings of usefulness may motivate the selection of adaptive health behaviors, like active pain coping, that promote the maintenance of social engagement and function with disability.This raises interesting implications for clinical care—specifically, the importance of recommending a broader range of interventions to persons with KOA aimed at both social and physical activity. Further research clarifying the psychological role of perceived usefulness in promoting health behavior is needed, but will continue to gain relevance as the population ages, rates of chronic disabilities like KOA continue to grow, and contributory roles of older adults as mentors, volunteers, and productive citizens increase.And so while my mother may make my father crazy, at least she makes him feel useful.What does usefulness mean to you? Related PostsHelpful Hacks for Researching With Older AdultsConducting clinical and other types of research with older adults is complex but rewarding if you take appropriate measures to reduce errors and bias.Wise Up: Study AgingI am certainly not blind to how fortuitously my interest in aging aligns with the needs of an aging world—and I certainly don’t need additional convincing that my decision to forgo law school was in equal measure, wise and slightly prescient. But maybe you do.Bridging the GapTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: disability Purposelast_img read more

Seniors air pollution exposure linked to hospitalization for ARDS

first_imgMay 23 2018In a new study, researchers found significant associations between seniors’ long-term exposure to two types of air pollution and hospitalization for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The study was presented at the 2018 American Thoracic Society International Conference.ARDS is a rapidly progressive disease that occurs in critically ill patients. The disease’s most serious complication is that fluid leaks into the lungs making breathing difficult or impossible. ARDS develops in patients with predisposing conditions such as sepsis, pneumonia, traumatic injury, and aspiration. The elderly population is at particularly high risk of developing ARDS and the ARDS mortality rate for elderly patients has been reported to be around 69 percent to 80 percent.”While there is growing evidence of the impact on lung health of numerous air pollutants, there have been few studies that have looked at acute respiratory diseases and air pollution across large populations,” said lead author Jongeun Rhee, ScD, of the T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts.Dr. Rhee and colleagues examined data from nearly 30 million Medicare beneficiaries (≥ age 65) per year discharged from American hospitals from 2000 through 2012. They tracked by zip code admissions due to an ARDS diagnosis. The researchers then computed annual average air concentrations of PM2.5, pollution-causing particles that are about 30 times smaller than the width of a human hair, and annual average ozone concentrations for these zip codes from April through September. They developed statistical models that enabled them to make associations between air pollution levels and ARDS hospitalizations, and adjusted their calculations to compensate for differences in weather, race, socioeconomic status and smoking status.Related StoriesScientists develop new, rapid test to diagnose bacterial lower respiratory tract infectionsMultifaceted intervention for acute respiratory infection improves antibiotic-prescribingLiving environment, air pollution may be linked to increased risk of hypertensionDr. Rhee’s team found statistically significant associations between yearly change in PM2.5 and ozone concentrations and yearly change in hospital admission rates for ARDS among the nation’s seniors. Hospital admissions for ARDS increased with increases in PM2.5 concentrations and increases associated with ozone levels as well. In low pollution regions, associations between chronic exposure to both PM2.5 and ozone had stronger associations compared to the entire U.S.”We highlighted the importance of air pollution as an environmental risk factor for ARDS, which has not been studied widely but contributed to a previous finding that was limited to ozone,” said Dr. Rhee. “Most importantly, we found increased hospital admission rates even when seniors were exposed to levels below current annual National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for PM2.5 (12.Dr. David Christiani, the study’s senior author, stated that: “Our findings are unique in showing that the adverse health effects of air pollution on our senior citizens now include acute respiratory failure and that an increase in hospitalization for ARDS in seniors occurs at the current U.S. air pollution standards. These results add to the growing body of literature on various adverse health effects at current standards that demonstrate a need to lower our exposure limits.”​Source: http://www.thoracic.org/last_img read more

New findings do no support caffeine as effective appetite suppressant or weightloss

first_imgJul 19 2018A new study featured in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics found that after drinking a small amount of caffeine, participants consumed 10 percent less at a breakfast buffet provided by researchers, but this effect did not persist throughout the day and had no impact on participants’ perceptions of their appetites. Based on these findings, the investigators have concluded that caffeine is not effective as an appetite suppressant and weight-loss aid.”Caffeine is frequently added to dietary supplements with claims that it suppresses appetite and facilitates weight loss. Previous research has speculated that caffeine speeds metabolism or affects brain chemicals that suppress appetite. In addition, epidemiological evidence suggests that regular caffeine consumers have a lower body mass index (BMI) than non-consumers. The purpose of our study was to determine whether caffeine can in fact be linked to reduced food intake or suppressed appetite, and if the results vary by BMI,” explained lead investigator Leah M. Panek-Shirley, PhD, SUNY University at Buffalo, Department Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Buffalo, NY, USA.On average, Americans drink eight ounces of coffee per day. Fifty healthy adults (aged 18-50 years) visited the investigators’ laboratory weekly over a month to participate in the study. Each time, they were asked to drink juice with added caffeine that was either equivalent to consumption of four ounces (1 mg/kg) or eight ounces (3 mg/kg) of coffee, or no coffee as a placebo dose. Thirty minutes later, participants were instructed to eat as much or as little as they wanted of a hearty breakfast buffet. The investigators asked participants to record everything they ate throughout each entire study day and sent them hourly reminder emails, linked to an online survey, to document their intake and appetite at each interval.Related StoriesUltra-processed foods cause overeating and weight gain, NIH study findsEnergy drinks may increase blood pressure and risk of electrical disturbances in heartAvoid ultra-processed food!The study determined that after drinking the juice with 1 kg/mg of caffeine, participants consumed about 70 fewer calories than they did after drinking juice with 3 mg/kg or no added caffeine. After reviewing what the participants ate for the rest of each study day, they found the small decrease in intake did not persist. Participants compensated for the reduced intake at breakfast later in the day. In addition, there were no differences in reported appetite associated with the caffeine doses. Finally, their individual BMIs had no effect on their food intake or appetite at all three caffeine levels.”This study, by nature of its rigorous design, reinforces the importance of good eating habits and not relying on unsupported weight loss aids or unhealthy practices,” commented Carol DeNysschen, PhD, RD, MPH, CDN, FAND, one of the investigators, Professor and Chair of the Department of Health, Nutrition, and Dietetics, SUNY Buffalo State College, Buffalo, NY, USA. She elaborated on the rigor of the double-blind, randomized, crossover design of the study: the order of the doses was randomized for the 50 participants, both participants and researchers did not know the dose of samples as they were being presented, and all participants received all dose treatments, thereby acting as their own controls to enable comparisons of their individual responses.Source: https://www.elsevier.com/last_img read more

Four tips to help prevent fall allergy symptoms

first_imgIf allergy symptoms are getting in the way of doing the things you want to do, see an allergist. An allergist can help treat your symptoms and help you get your life on track. Use ACAAI’s allergist locator to find an allergist in your area. Source:https://acaai.org/news/get-ready-fall-allergies-because-theyre-headed-your-way Aug 15 2018You’ve just gotten your summer routine dialed in, and you have to think about how to keep fall allergies at bay? Yes. But the good news is if you start planning now, your allergy symptoms will likely be much less severe, and you’ll be able to enjoy the beauty the fall season brings.”Fall can arrive with bad allergy symptoms,” says allergist Bradley Chipps, MD, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. “Many people don’t realize if they spend time preparing now, they won’t get hit as hard with sneezing, runny noses and itchy eyes when fall allergies descend with full force. It’s a matter of planning ahead for what you know is coming based on your past experiences.”Here are four tips to help you keep fall allergy symptoms from ruining hayrides and your enjoyment of the changing leaves:center_img Fall? Warm temps make us think it’s still summer – The coming of fall doesn’t automatically mean cool weather. Unseasonably warm weather for longer periods of time is no longer a rare occurrence. Mild temperatures along with rain can promote plant and pollen growth, while wind accompanying rainfall can stir pollen and mold into the air, heightening symptoms for fall allergy sufferers. Because fall allergies may start earlier and last longer, it’s important to begin taking your allergy medications at least two weeks before your symptoms normally start. And don’t stop your medications until pollen counts have been down for about two weeks – usually after the first frost. Beautiful leaves + mold = misery – Those fall leaves may be gorgeous, but once they’ve fallen they begin to gather mold. And mold is an allergen that thrives in fall. In addition to leaves, mold can be found anywhere there is water – including in your backyard, in a field of uncut grass and in clogged gutters. If you are allergic to mold, the key to reducing it is moisture control. Be sure to clean standing water anywhere you find it. You can also help ward off mold by cleaning gutters regularly and keeping home humidity below 60 percent. Back to school, back to allergies? – If your child suddenly seems to have a constant runny nose, itchy eyes, a cough and sneezing, they could be dealing with allergens in their classroom. Kids can be allergic to dust in the classroom, or there might be pollen coming in through open windows. And don’t forget about mold – often found in bathrooms and locker rooms – as well as dander from pets that other kids may bring in on clothing and backpacks. If your child seems to have symptoms that came on around the time school started, make an appointment with an allergist. An allergist can set your child on the right track, for the long term, to handle their allergies or asthma. Dodging pollen means dodging symptoms – Whether it’s ragweed, which is fall’s most prominent pollen, or another type, keeping pollen out of your life means fewer allergy symptoms. Some simple “housekeeping” tips can help. When you come in from outside, make sure pollen doesn’t come with you. Leave your shoes at the door and throw clothes in the washing machine. Shower and wash hair in the evening before bed so you’re not sleeping with pollen and getting it on your pillow and in your nose. Keep windows closed and run the A/C in both your home and your car. Monitor pollen and mold counts online so you can determine when it’s best to stay inside.last_img read more

Genital warts may promote HIV sexual transmission

first_imgAug 21 2018A new study has shown that genital warts may promote HIV sexual transmission and, in turn, their treatment and prevention could help decrease the spread of the disease.Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a common and highly infectious condition transmitted between persons during sexual skin-to-skin contact. It has more than 100 strains identified, with some “lower risk” types associated with development of genital warts. While this condition has typically been seen as more of an annoyance than a threat, there is emerging evidence that genital warts may leave affected individuals at greater risk for contracting HIV from an infected partner.Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) took biopsy samples of genital warts and compared the number of “HIV-target cells” (cells that can become infected with the virus) to that found in normal tissue from the same areas of the body. In addition, genital wart samples taken from HIV-uninfected men were cultured with HIV to determine whether these lesions were at high risk for infection.Related StoriesPatients with HIV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid have high risk of experiencing cognitive deficitsAlcohol reduction associated with improved viral suppression in women living with HIVHIV DNA persists in spinal fluid despite treatment, linked to cognitive impairmentThey found that, compared to normal tissue from the same patient, anogenital warts had a significantly higher density of HIV-target cells. Of the anogenital wart samples studied, approximately half had high concentrations of these cells in the outermost layer of skin (the one most likely to be contacted during sexual intercourse). In addition, of the eight samples cultured with HIV, two showed definitive signs of HIV infection, signifying that some anogenital warts may be highly susceptible to HIV infection.Deborah Anderson, PhD, corresponding author and BUSM professor of obstetrics and gynecology, said these results are a sign that we should be more aggressive in treating genital warts. She also recognizes the potential global implications for these findings. “Large scale roll out of HPV vaccines in HIV-endemic areas, such as sub-Saharan Africa could significantly impact the HIV epidemic in those regions.”Source: https://www.bmc.org/last_img read more

Current state of femoral artery access technique

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 11 2018In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3,Number 2, 2018, pp. 255-261(7); DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0061 Syed Raza Shah and Ki Park from UCF/HCA GME Consortium Internal Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA and Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA consider the contemporary role of femoral artery access.Related StoriesLiving with advanced breast cancerMosquito surveillance in Madagascar reveals new insight into malaria transmissionChaos in the house and asthma in children – the connectionThe scope of interventional cardiology has rapidly expanded over the last several decades. In a field where procedural treatment options for a variety of complex cardiovascular conditions have grown exponentially, the importance of procedural safety continues to come to the forefront. This is most evident in the movement toward radial access as the initial approach for operators in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. As the evidence grows for the superiority of radial access over femoral access with regard to reducing bleeding events and improving clinical outcomes, the authors discuss the modern approach to obtaining access, and highlight best practices.CVIA is available on the IngentaConnect platform and at Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications. Submissions may be made using ScholarOne Manuscripts. There are no author submission or article processing fees. CVIA is indexed in the ESCI, OCLC, Primo Central (Ex Libris), Sherpa Romeo, NISC (National Information Services Corporation), DOAJ and Index Copernicus Databases. Follow CVIA on Twitter @CVIA_Journal; or Facebook. Source:http://cvia-journal.org/last_img read more

Podcast Treating cocaine addiction mirror molecules in space and new insight into

first_imgListen to stories on the first mirror image molecule spotted in outer space, looking at the role of touch in the development of autism, and grafting on lab-built bones, with online news editor David Grimm.   Karen Ersche talks about why cocaine addiction is so hard to treat and what we can learn by bringing addicted subjects into the lab with host Sarah Crespi.   [Image: Science/Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img

2020 census gets huge budget boost but addition of citizenship question worries

first_img 2020 census gets huge budget boost, but addition of citizenship question worries critics Money matters. But for supporters of the 2020 U.S. census, money isn’t everything. Even as advocates praise the generosity Congress showed the Census Bureau in the final 2018 spending bill it passed last week, they worry that a decision made yesterday by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to add a question about citizenship to the upcoming decennial head count could undermine its accuracy.First the good news.The spending bill gives the Census Bureau $2.814 billion in the current fiscal year that ends on 30 September. That’s nearly double the president’s 2018 request for the agency and almost $1 billion more than what advocates said it needed in the eighth year of the 10-year cycle to prepare for and conduct the decennial census in April 2020. Of that total, $2.544 billion goes into the account that funds the 2020 headcount and the American Community Survey, a rolling poll of 3.5 million residents using what had been the long form of the decennial census. And the 2020 census will get the lion’s share of that total. (The exact amount has yet to be determined.)  The 2018 appropriation tops by more than $1 billion the $987 million Ross said the 2020 census needed. That figure added $187 million to the administration’s initial 2018 request, based on what Ross said were cost overruns in a new computer system for coordinating the agency’s preparations for the headcount.But Congress went even further. Noting that 70% of the costs of the decennial census—now estimated to be $15.6 billion—come in the final 2 years, legislators in effect decided to make a down payment on that total in the 2018 budget. They also included some $50 million in contingency funding for 2018 that Ross had folded into his new estimate but not requested.The largess was welcome by census advocates. “The dismal trend of many years of underfunding 2020 census preparations has finally been reversed,” says Phil Sparks of the Census Project, a nonprofit coalition based in Washington, D.C. “Our assessment is the Bureau now has the minimum resources needed to prepare for its constitutional mandate.”Terri Ann Lowenthal, another veteran census watcher based in Connecticut, thinks the money also reflects self-interest. “I think the significant funding boost reflects a bipartisan recognition among lawmakers that the success of the census in all of their districts and states could be in jeopardy and that it is their responsibility to ensure a good outcome.”Controversial questionBut preparing for 2020 isn’t just about the money. Last December, the Department of Justice (DOJ) upset the usual orderly process of nailing down the final version of the census questionnaire by asking the agency to consider adding a question about citizenship. Justice officials say the change is needed to enforce federal laws regarding voter eligibility by determining who is a citizen.The request inflamed immigration and human rights advocates, who argued that immigrants already distrustful of the government would avoid filling out the census out of fear that their answers could jeopardize their status in the country. That reaction would further depress response rates, forcing the Census Bureau to spend more money on follow-up and imperiling the accuracy of the count. The move also drew opposition from Democratic politicians at the state and federal level, who made similar arguments about the impact on the census, which is also used for the once-in-a-decade process of drawing new districts for the U.S. House of Representatives.Those concerns failed to dissuade the Department of Commerce’s Ross, however. Last night he issued an eight-page memo announcing his decision to add the question to the 2020 survey.The memo makes two main points. First, it accepts DOJ’s assertion that a citizenship question is needed to enforce the Voting Rights Act. Ross says the department needs data on individual neighborhoods to ensure that minority rights are protected and that the 2020 census is the only way to gather such data.Civil rights groups dispute that argument. They say citizenship is not needed to enforce the law and that collecting such data will actually have the opposite effect, that is, it will “undermine the law and weaken voting rights enforcement.”In a related matter, Ross’s memo asserts that a question on citizenship has long been a fixture of the decennial census and that he is simply “reinstating” it. The facts suggest otherwise. As ScienceInsider noted in a 2 January story, the Census Bureau does have a 200-year history of asking residents about their origins. In 1820 people were asked whether they were “foreigners not naturalized.” In 1850, they were asked about their place of birth, and in 1900, a question was added on the year they entered the country.But starting in 1950, those questions were moved to the long form of the census. That goes to one in six households, meaning that most residents were never asked about their origins or immigration status. And after the 2000 census, the long form was dropped from the decennial census and converted into the American Community Survey, a lengthy questionnaire that goes annually to about 3 million households.Ross’s second point challenges the notion that the move would depress response rates. “[N]either the Census Bureau nor the concerned stakeholders could document that the response rate would, in fact, decline materially,” he wrote.The absence of a permanent director and deputy director at the Census Bureau apparently forced Ross to conduct his own investigation into the impact of a citizenship question on response rates. As a result, his memo is sprinkled with anonymous comments that he attributes to previous Census officials. Their input, the memo explains, led Ross to conclude that “the need for accurate citizenship data and the limited burden that the reinstatement of the citizenship question would impose outweigh fears about a potentially lower response rate.”Politicians were quick to react to Ross’s decision. The state of California immediately filed a suit, claiming the question violates the U.S. Constitution. Last month the state’s attorney general had joined colleagues in 18 other states in a letter to Ross urging him not to add a citizenship question.Meanwhile, some members of Congress want to prevent future administrations from adding any questions to the census at the last minute. Last week, Representative Carolyn Maloney (NY) and a handful of other Democrats introduced a bill (H.R. 5359) that would require that any new questions be “researched, studied, and tested” for at least 3 years. It would also require the General Accountability Office, the congressional watchdog agency, to certify that such vetting had occurred before any new questions were added. Ross’s decision could enhance the prospects of such a bill, which was seen as having little chance of passage when it was introduced. By Jeffrey MervisMar. 27, 2018 , 10:00 AM Critics of a request to add a question about citizenship to the 2020 census fear it will reduce response rates, harming accuracy and increasing the need for expensive face-to-face follow-up. U.S. Census Bureau center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. 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New rule could force EPA to ignore major human health studies

first_img New rule could force EPA to ignore major human health studies By Warren CornwallApr. 25, 2018 , 6:15 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Scott Pruitt is administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency. “The era of secret science at EPA is coming to an end,” Pruitt said, speaking to an audience that included conservative lawmakers and advocates who have questioned the science underpinning climate and health regulations. “Americans deserve to assess the legitimacy of the science underpinning EPA decisions that may impact their lives.”But a number of leading epidemiologists studying the effects of pollution say the new regulations could pose a problem for existing and new studies aimed at teasing out connections between pollution and large populations. “I think this rule is a thinly veiled attempt to undermine the science that’s available for the EPA to use in its decision-making,” says Peter Thorne, a toxicologist at The University of Iowa in Iowa City, and chairman of EPA’s science advisory board until late 2017, when his membership wasn’t renewed by Pruitt.The new proposal would effectively block the use of key scientific studies and “help big polluters avoid regulations that protect human health,” warned the American Thoracic Society, a New York City–based medical association representing physicians and scientists involved in respiratory disease.Other critics say EPA has failed to adequately calculate the costs of complying with its proposal, or clearly articulate its legal authority to issue the new rule, potentially opening the agency to a legal challenge.Privacy concernsThe problem, critics say, is that human epidemiological studies often rely on gathering reams of sensitive information from thousands of individuals, such as their medical history and personal habits, along with exactly where they live and work. Those details are usually guarded by confidentiality agreements that bar researchers from sharing data that would allow an individual to be identified.Existing studies could be bound by confidentiality agreements that make it impossible to give EPA the data it wants, Thorne says. And future researchers could have more trouble recruiting participants if they fear their information would be made public. “If those [confidentiality] documents say we will be required to release your private information to the U.S. government or to the public, [people] would be wise not to participate,” he says.In its proposed rule, EPA says it wants to make data publicly available “in a manner that honors legal and ethical obligations to reduce the risks of unauthorized disclosure and reidentification” of anonymous study subjects. The agency says sensitive data could be shielded by a variety of measures, including storing them at special federal data centers and restricting who has access to them. And it suggests that the transparency requirement could, in certain circumstances, be waived if not practical to implement. It does not provide an estimate of the cost of complying with the rule.In a press release the agency claimed the proposed provisions are consistent with data access requirements of major scientific journals include Nature, Science, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Science, along with many other journals, has recently adopted measures to encourage data sharing and increase transparency, Science Editor-in-Chief Jeremy Berg said in a prepared statement. Those measure can include requiring authors of published papers to deposit underlying data in a publicly available database. But he noted there are “exceptional circumstances, where data cannot be shared openly with all,” including cases where papers are based on data sets that include personal information. Journals will still publish those papers, but will tell researchers wishing to reanalyze or replicate the studies to negotiate directly with the authors to obtain the sensitive data.In general, researchers who share their data usually first strip information such as name, date of birth, or place of residence that would enable people to trace it back to an individual, says Joel Kaufman, an epidemiologist at the University of Washington in Seattle who is studying air pollution and heart disease. He’s now preparing a “limited” data set for the roughly 7000 participants in his study, so that other researchers can work with it. “That’s the right thing to do,” Kaufman says. “But I fear that that’s not enough for what the proponents of this regulation are trying to do, which is to get data that we know we can’t provide.”On the industry side, an American Chemistry Council (ACC) spokesperson says the Washington, D.C.–based trade group is looking at the new EPA rule, but has few detailed comments at this point. “Our industry is committed to working with EPA to help ensure the final rule increases transparency and public confidence in the agency’s regulations while protecting personal privacy, confidential business information, proprietary interest and intellectual property rights,” spokesperson Jon Corley said in a prepared statement. In the past, ACC has supported similar efforts to bar EPA from using nonpublic data in certain kinds of rulemakings, while noting that the agency often uses confidential or proprietary data provided by industry in doing its work.For example, industries fund extensive research into the health effects of chemicals, often through private laboratories that rely on animal testing. In internal EPA emails released by the Union of Concerned Scientists in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the agency’s deputy administrator in the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention, Nancy Beck, wrote that for a majority of industry studies, confidential business information “can be waived and the data can be made available.” (Beck was formerly a top official at the chemistry council.) But the EPA proposal also suggests such industry information could be exempted from the transparency rule.Long historyThe new EPA proposal is the latest in a long-running campaign to let the public and regulated industries sift through the raw data of epidemiologists whose work could affect pollution regulations.In the 1990s, members of Congress pressed for legislation requiring scientists to disclose their raw scientific data, partly in response to a Harvard University study finding a correlation between more air pollution and lower life expectancy. Several times in recent years, the House of Representatives passed a bill requiring public disclosure of data from any new studies used by EPA to write regulations, but the proposal never made it out of Congress. The champion of that bill, Representative LamarSmith (R–TX), flanked Pruitt at Tuesday’s unveiling of the new proposal, smiling.EPA will now accept public comments on the proposal for 30 days, then is expected to issue a final rule.Environmental groups and others have already said they expect to challenge the rule in court. Potential lines of attack, attorneys say, include claims that EPA has not met the letter of federal law in evaluating the rule’s costs and benefits, or explained which federal law has provided it with the authority to issue the new requirements.Correction, 4/26/2018, 12:00 p.m.: The lawmaker standing next to EPA Adminstrator Scott Pruitt was misidentified. It was Representative Lamar Smith (R-TX), not Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN). Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0) center_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Research looking at everything from links between air pollution and disease to the impact a pesticide has on children’s brains could be banned from consideration by environmental regulators under a new policy proposed yesterday by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).At an event at EPA headquarters in Washington, D.C., that was closed to the press, agency head Scott Pruitt touted the new policy as a way to increase transparency and enable the public to double-check research underpinning environmental regulations. The rule would require the agency to use only studies in which the underlying data are available for public scrutiny when formulating new “significant” regulations, which typically are regulations estimated to impose costs of $100 million or more.Specifically, the proposed rule says that EPA is seeking transparency for “the dose response data and models that underlie what we are calling ‘pivotal regulatory science.’” The agency does not define pivotal regulatory science, but says it could include studies that “are critical to the calculation of a final regulatory standard or level, or to the quantified costs, benefits, risks, and other impacts on which a final regulation is based.”last_img read more

QA Why fishery managers need to overhaul recreational fishing rules

first_img Q&A: Why fishery managers need to overhaul recreational fishing rules Email By Erik StokstadMar. 20, 2019 , 12:10 PM Robert Arlinghaus with a sea trout he caught off the Danish coast Q: Can you describe the appeal of recreational fishing?A: I’ve been fishing since I was a child. For many nonanglers, this comes across as the most boring activity you can imagine. But there’s nothing else that really taps into all of the senses, the environment, smelling the water, seeing the birds, and being with your buddies in a challenging environment on a boat. It has to do with the unknown—you don’t know whether you’ll catch a fish. It’s kind of the ultimate experience, with the benefit of bringing home sustainable seafood. I know so many people who can’t think about life without angling.Q: What’s changing in recreational fisheries?A: Some fisheries are experiencing increasing pressure while stocks decline, and therefore conflicts are escalating, for example in the Baltic cod fisheries. In Germany, there’s a lot of rebellion. Anglers are organizing themselves, they’re fighting policymakers that recently implemented daily limits for cod. They want to maintain unregulated access to the resource and they feel unfairly treated. There’s also increasing conflicts in freshwater areas. We see currently a lot of movement from nature conservation agencies and the associated NGOs [nongovernmental organizations] to designate conservation areas and then ban or severely constrain recreational fishing. And this creates a lot of anger and local and regional debate.Q: Why is it more challenging to manage a recreational fishery?A: First of all, it’s the sheer number of people who aren’t very organized. And they differ in their objectives, preferences, and therefore behavior. A sizable fraction of anglers really enjoy having fish for dinner, so they seek opportunities for a good catch, and let’s say liberal harvest regulations. And then there are trophy anglers, maybe who don’t eat any fish and release them instead. But they seek trophies and they don’t mind traveling far, to places where fish have good growth and little mortality. We really have to account for the diversity of preferences.Q: So what should be done?A: The first step is explicitly considering recreational fisheries. Often, a management agency just looks at commercial goals and objectives, and that’s not necessarily the best target for recreational resources. There are solutions. We can explicitly manage for diversity in, let’s say, the freshwater landscape where we have many different lakes. But in Germany, for example, we have a one-size-fits-all harvest policy in state law. That is superimposed on all lakes no matter what productivity they have and which type of angler you have locally.Q: What does it mean to manage a fishery for diversity? A: To really think about the different experiences that you want produce. On a family outing with your children, you want them to catch a few fish easily. Then you have the specialized high-avidity anglers. They have no problem spending weeks in the year waiting for one bite from, say, a trophy carp. The harder the challenge, the greater the achievement, and for some anglers that’s the perfect fishing experience. In a landscape with many lakes, you could have a set of lakes for the harvest-oriented people and a set of lakes for the families and a set of lakes for trophy fishing. If you manage fisheries cleverly, you can create outcomes with happy people and limited overfishing.Q: Do fishing associations already do this, or do you see a need for action by governments or authorities?A: Some angling clubs in central Europe do that diversified management. But they could benefit from more strategic advice, because it’s often done from a gut feeling. In the U.S., as an extreme example, you have public agencies overseeing a whole state and anglers are basically unorganized and buy an annual license for the whole state. They do have special regulation waters, but again these are often done in an ad hoc fashion, based on political pressure. They may not systematically evaluate what it means if you change the regulation of one lake, what that means for the other lakes around them, because the angler effort will shift.Q: Do you have a success story of an effective angler organization?A: I like the central European approach. Basically, for freshwater systems the fishing rights are given to angler organizations, but also the duty to keep these lakes in good shape. And so that creates a perfect incentive structure. We have studied such systems very intensively in Germany. We were amazed how much voluntary input people give, how much money they invest for resource management and for all sorts of things. They really, really care and they invest heavily in local compliance and enforcement—something that is extremely hard to accomplish in marine fisheries, where you have open systems and everybody kind of battles for the same fish. So creating some form of property rights can foster a lot of good incentives.Q: Could that management system work in other places?A: It certainly has limitations under certain property rights regimes. My colleagues in the U.S. say this model of complete devolution of rights to the local scale—not only catches, but also management—is unthinkable because of the public trust doctrine and allowing free access to everybody. Yet there are intermediate systems. For example, in Wisconsin, lake associations care for local water bodies. You have similar systems like this in Canada in some provinces. And it would simply be a matter of public agencies giving associations a bit more rights and involving them more than they could have the same outcome as you have in central Europe.Q: Any downsides to private management of lake fishing?A: The negative side is certainly that access is restricted and local managers might be too active. Take the example of stocking lakes with extra fish. Some managers try to support their fisheries by buying young fish from all sorts of catchments and they mix populations. Stocking can harm biodiversity. You can have issues with spread of nonnative species and so on; that is a risk and it’s not well addressed under such a system.Q: What about coastal fishing?A: In the marine environment it’s more difficult for sure. Particularly because the fish move around and aren’t confined to lakes. And there are more stocks that are in trouble—exploited, for example, by both commercial and recreational fisheries. For these, I think other policy changes are needed to get the incentives right. They should move away from simply setting out an annual license that an individual can buy—and then get basically unlimited access to that fishery—to a system of issuing harvest tags. So, like wildlife management, you buy the right to keep a fish. And these tags are given out in limited numbers commensurate with a biological state of the resource. I think the system would be very good for stocks with a great deal of conflict, such as red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico, the Baltic cod fishery, or the bluefin tuna fishery in the Mediterranean.Q: What does the harvest tag system require?A: You have to have a system in place to monitor the catch. But with technology, smartphone apps and so on, this could be done. Obviously, anglers don’t like to be regulated; for the most part, they don’t like to be monitored either. So this really can create a lot of conflict. And one has to seriously consider the distributional aspects; these tags should not be so expensive that poorer people don’t have access. So maybe a certain number could be released by lotteries or some other way that is fair to all. Q: Can science help?A: Harvest tags are a great idea, but this needs to be tested with bio-economic models to really look at how people and the entire fishery respond to different policy options. And how do you allocate different regulations in space? How do anglers respond to those changes, where do they go? How do you decide what to do where and what type of sampling to assess the status? If you’re dealing with thousands of lakes it’s financially impossible to do regular monitoring. And there are many biological questions. How do different fish respond to catch and release? Do they die?Q: What questions do you find most intriguing?A: I’m intrigued by a hypothesis we put out recently called fisheries-induced timidity. The idea is that in recreational fishing, the fish decides whether it takes the bait or not. We have some experimental evidence now that fish become more timid, less eager to take the bait. And that is really important to know, because the catch rates will go down—even if the abundance of fish is not declining, and anglers will be very unhappy. And also important is that our ability to assess fish stocks also declines.Q: Your paper talks about “optimizing angler well-being.” What’s an ideal fishing experience for you?A: If I go fishing with my son, who’s 6 years old, it’s high catch rates and being home in 2 hours. If I go with my buddies, the ideal fishing trip is being alone, beautiful scenery, and the chance of catching a big fish. In that sense, it’s more a trophy experience that I like, in nature and away from it all. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe For environmental conflict and political drama, it’s hard to beat fishing. Almost all the fish consumed by developed countries comes from industrial fisheries, which generate not just a lot of revenue, but controversy over their impact, such as accidentally harming seabirds or scraping the sea floor. Meanwhile, recreational fishing usually escapes notice. Although it also has a large impact, both environmental and economic, amateur fishing is often ignored by regulators or swept under the same kind of rules as commercial fishing. This needs to change, researchers argue in a commentary published online yesterday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).Each year, recreational anglers catch an estimated 47 billion fish. About half are let go, but there can be a sizable impact on fish stocks. Populations can be depleted in small lakes, for example. Intense fishing can cause fish to evolve to smaller sizes and adopt new behaviors. And some management practices designed to please freshwater anglers, such as the release of popular but nonnative species, can harm biodiversity. Off the coast, saltwater anglers are sometimes chasing the same fish as commercial boats, leading to conflicts between the two groups.Researchers have been thinking about how to improve management of recreational fisheries and reduce conflicts, and a group of experts offers recommendations in the PNAS article. ScienceInsider spoke with one of the lead authors, biologist Robert Arlinghaus of Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries in Berlin. Arlinghaus is also an avid angler. The interview has been edited for brevity and clarity. Christian Skov Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Historic Settlement For David Clarke Jail Victims Family

first_img A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ Now, the family of one of those victims is getting a massive settlement.SEE ALSO: David Clarke Retains Master’s Degree After Embarrassing Struggle To Correct PlagiarismAccording to The Associated Press, Milwaukee County paid nearly $7 million to settle a lawsuit from the family of Terrill Thomas “whose dehydration death in jail was described by his attorneys as torture.” The settlement went public this week but it was finalized in March.Attorneys for the family said, “The size of the settlement I believe reflected the tremendous pain and suffering that Mr. Thomas endured for days.” The attorneys also said it is one of the largest ever in Wisconsin for a jail death.Terrill Thomas, 38, was having a mental breakdown he was arrested on April 14, 2016. He allegedly shot a man in front of his parents’ home and then fire a gun inside a casino.While in jail, his water turned off because he supposedly flooded another cell by stuffing a mattress in the toilet. The Associated Press reports, “The water was never turned back on and he died a week later. He lost 34 pounds (15.5 kilograms), or 10 percent of his body weight, during the week he was deprived of water, according to the lawsuit.”Erik Heipt, a Seattle-based attorney who also represented Thomas’ family, said, “What happened to him was a form of torture. This sort of atrocity should never happen at an American jail. There’s no excuse for it.”The massive settlement will be split between Thomas’ six children (four are minors). The lawsuit against the jail, which, again, happened on David Clarke’s watch, is now dismissed. Former Milwaukee County Sheriff David A. Clarke is one of President Donald Trump’s most loyal Black supporters. However, what is most important to know about him is, according to The Washington Post, at least four people died in the Milwaukee County jail that he managed from April 2015 to November 2016 — including a newborn baby whose birth occurred unbeknownst to staff. In a separate incident, his workers were accused of refusing to give water for a week to an inmate, who later died. More By NewsOne Staff AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMoreShare to EmailEmailEmail President Donald Trump Participates In A Reception For National African-American History Month Our condolences go out to Terrill Thomas’ family.SEE ALSO:Outrageous! Figurines Of White Cherub Crushing Head Of Black Angel Removed From Dollar StoreMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s ClothesDavid Clarke Has Sunken Place Meltdown After Cory Booker Destroys DHS Secretary On Live TV Black Lives Matter , David Clarke , Milwaukee The Most Ridiculous Photos From Trump’s Farce Of A Black History Month Celebration Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more

Priceless Treasure from Mysterious Ancient People Recently Found

first_imgArchaeologists have found a treasure trove of 3,000 gold and precious items in Kazakhstan in a burial mound in the remote Tarbagatai mountains. It’s believed the “priceless” stash that belonged to the Saka people and could date to eight centuries before the birth of Christ. This treasure may yield important insights into the Saka. They were nomadic people who spoke an Iranian language and were a sub-group of the Scythians, who dominated the Eurasian Steep for centuries. The Saka focus was in Central Asia, and expanded from there into Iran, India, and Central Asia.The burial mound is believed to have belonged to a prestigious couple. Professor Zainolla Samashev, in charge of the excavations, said in an interview: “A large number of valuable finds in this burial mound let us believe a man and a woman are buried here–the reigning persons or people who belonged to the elite of Saka society.”Scythia and Parthia in about 170 BC (before the Yuezhi invaded Bactria). Photo by Dbachmann CC BY-SA 3.0Head of the East-Kazakhstan region Danial Akhmetov said to the Daily Mail: “This find gives us a completely different view of the history of our people.” It is now evident that these people were exceptionally skilled in mining, or extraction, selling and jewelry making,” he said.“We are the heirs of the great people and great technologies,” Akhmetov said.The Saka were renowned for their horsemanship. First recorded in the 9th century B.C., they were a major military power. Archaeologists rediscovered their culture and history in the twentieth century.A cataphract-style parade armour of a Saka royal, also known as “The Golden Warrior,” from the Issyk kurgan, a historical burial site near ex-capital city of Almaty, Kazakhstan.Among the finds are earrings in the shape of bells, gold plates with rivets, plaques, chains, and a necklace with precious stones.6 of the Biggest Treasure Troves Ever DiscoveredGold beads decorating clothes were made with the use of sophisticated micro-soldering techniques, supporting a high level of development in jewelry-making skills.Archeologists do expect to find the remains of the prestigious couple, the owners of the treasures, but they have not yet dug open their graves.This discovery turns some assumptions on their head. Primarily, how could a nomadic people produce this type of finely detailed jewelry that required metalwork and mining?“This suggests that our ancestors possessed the technology and also had vast knowledge in the field of metallurgy,” said the archaeologists in a statement.Other excavations in Central Kazakhstan have found stone dwellings that were apparently made more than 2,500 years ago. One anthropologist wrote that the economy of the region was built on cattle breeding, and findings of stone hoes and grain growers indicate some agricultural advances.Gold artifacts of the Saka in Bactria. Photo by World Imaging CC BY-SA 3.0In the centuries before the birth of Christ, nomadic tribes dominated Eurasia, from what is today western China all the way to the Danube. However, despite their nomadic nature, the elites did have monumental burial structures and grave goods. Some of the graves have been plundered over the centuries, spoiling archaeological research.In 1936 the country was made the Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic. Kazakhstan was the last of republics to declare independence from the Soviet Union in 1991.Location of Kazakhstan (red) within the Soviet Union. Photo by Shadowxfox CC BY-SA 3.0“Since Kazakshtan’s independence, archaeologists have been grappling with the task of studying an ancient history,” according to an article in the Astana Times. This site was reportedly excavated two years ago, but there was also some digging in the area in the 18th century during the reign of Peter the Great.Read another story from us: Ancient Romans Used the Word “Abracadabra” to Cure MalariaIt is believed that there are up to 200 burial mounds in the area. This was a “plateau with rich pastures seen as paradise by the Saka kings,” according to the Daily Mail.Nearby, the team has “also discovered seven more recent Islamic graves that date to the 15th and 16th centuries,” according to Archaeology. “The graves were oriented toward Mecca, and some of them contained jewelry, including a copper ring, a bronze earring, and a silver buckle.”Nancy Bilyeau, a former staff editor at Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, and InStyle, has written a trilogy of historical thrillers for Touchstone Books. For more information, go to www.nancybilyeau.com.last_img read more